1953 Chevrolet 3100 - brake line clip - how to remove?

Discussion in '1947-1954' started by Woogeroo, Apr 29, 2018.

  1. Woogeroo

    Woogeroo Member

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    Seeing the USA in my Chevrolet!
    1953 Chevrolet 3100 Series

    brake lines

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    Hi folks, I am trying to remove the brake lines from this truck, so that I can replace them. I got to the cross member that goes under the cab... there is a brake line there with a 7/16 fitting on it... and it is held on by these two large fasteners, which I think are large clutch heads? I dunno, been awhile since I messed with those.

    Do they screw out or not?

    Do any of you know what size it is? I need to get a proper tool to take it off so I can get the brake line off.

    This is the fastener I am referring to :

    image of fastener in question

    the folder of brake line photos :

    album of 1953 Chevrolet 3100 Series - brake line photos

    Thanks folks.

    -Woog
     
  2. morabuffalo

    morabuffalo Member

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    What I would do, if I were in your shoes.....take a little pick or screwdriver and lift that tab. Grab the line and yank it out...your getting rid of it. Yes? Carefully, hit the tab a bit when putting it back on or cut that whole thing off and put in a new one. Good luck, rod
    Oh, yes they can screw out with a clutch or modified driver, but it may not be worth it to you.





     
  3. Woogeroo

    Woogeroo Member

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    ok folks, I now have some clutch head drivers for my 3/8 ratchet, yay.

    I got the clips out... now I need to get the brake line loose from the back of the master cylinder.

    fyi : those clips on the cross member, the clutch head fasteners have a square nut and a washer on the back holding it on.

    brake line that goes into the back of the master cylinder

    It really does not seem to want to break loose with my brake line wrench on it.

    I sprayed it with pb blaster and left it alone.

    I also added other photos to the original folder, linked in the original post.

    Suggestions welcome.

    -Woog
     
  4. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    Hey Woog.. FWIW try a 50/50 mix of ATF / Acetone. Seems to work better than any off the shelf store bought product for penetrating.
     
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  5. coilover

    coilover Member

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    It looks like your lines need replacing and if they do just cut them off close to the nut and use a box end wrench or six point socket on them. Go back with Cunifer ( copper nickel) lines as they resist rust and are much easier to work with. The big nut on the back is about 7/8 IIRC and has to come off for a rebuild. It has a copper gasket (washer) on each side so save if possible. If you want to save all intact then heat is the answer. The ATF/acetone mix is WAY better than any other penetrant than any other including Kroil.
     
  6. morabuffalo

    morabuffalo Member

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    If it does not work the simple way...try hitting it lightly on the side if the nut to get a bit of a vibe going. The secret formula at times works better. rod
     
  7. Zig

    Zig Member

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    I strongly suggest replacing the old brake lines.
    I put new shoes on mine, rebuilt the master, put on new wheel cylinders, and very shortly decided to say screw it, and put disc brakes and a new rear end in mine.
    I will never forget how I felt while holding the old brake line that connected the two front brakes.
    As I was holding that section, I noticed a tiny little stream of brake fluid coming from a pin sized hole where the clamp under the radiator had held it to the frame.
    Since it’s Sunday, this is a good time to mention how I thanked God for watching out over me, yet again.
    Good luck with your project. Good brakes mean everything!
     

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