Any interest?

Discussion in '1947-1954' started by Depoebay, Jun 29, 2017.

  1. Depoebay

    Depoebay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    I am getting ready to build a wood bed for my 52 pickup. I will be using a single sheet of plywood. Would like to do a step by step with Pics. Pics for the end result.

    Don't want to step on any vendors toes.

    Jerry
     

    Attached Files:

  2. denisf

    denisf Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    364
    Location:
    Colchester, CT/ Clermont, FL
    Looks great!
     
  3. LaTroca52

    LaTroca52 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2007
    Messages:
    818
    Awesome wish I could get pic to a full screen
    What type of wood and clear did you use?
    Stuff from local big box store?
     
  4. Depoebay

    Depoebay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    Mahogany plywood. Finish is West Systems epoxy. Great product.

    If there is no objection I will go forward.

    When I decided to redo the bed in my 55 I did a lot of research. Lots of bed kits out there.
    I hit a lot of car shows in the summer here in Oregon. Look at the pickups, 99% have the bed kits in them. I saw one with appeared to be a vynal wrap to look like a wood bed with strips.

    I wanted something different. The finish, bed strips, and plywood are a decision is up to you.

    Next post will be cross braces and a relocated gas tak
     
  5. Depoebay

    Depoebay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    Well here goes. First step was installing an after market fuel tank. According to directions yhe tank is supposed to be bolted to frame rails using the flanges welded to the tank. I had to unbolt the leaf spring shackles to get it into place.

    I was not pleased with a metal to metal fitment for a fuel tank and noticed the tank sat to high. The fuel fill flanges and filler cap assembly were overlapping.

    I measured out enough room to get a 2 to 3 inch rubber fuel hose in. I used UHMVW or cutting board material for spacers with stainless fasteners. 20170701_110410_001.jpg 20170701_110456.jpg Plastic rusts here in Oregon. I checked to make sure the tank did not sit to low. Clearance is fine as I can see the bottom of the pumpkin.
    20170701_110819.jpg
    Next Post will installing the cross braces.
     
  6. Zig

    Zig Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,860
    Location:
    Pittsburg KS
    Cool beans! I just ordered up some hedge wood cut to widths and length for the bed of my truck. $48.00 is what it will run me.
    I've wanted to install hedge from the beginning, just because it is one of the toughest, native woods you can get around here.
    It may not look as good as yellow pine, but it will help the "Kansas" through and through thing I have going.
    That really looks like a beautiful finish/color you have there, however!
    Absolutely sweet!
    Thanks for sharing this because you might help someone else who is mulling this over as well!
     
  7. Depoebay

    Depoebay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    Thanks Zig. Will be moving forward soon with the project
     
  8. coilover

    coilover Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2005
    Messages:
    2,495
    Location:
    Plano US
    On a truck that a long time friend wanted to do mostly on his own and did except for the final making the tin smooth he chose to go with a single sheet plywood bed floor. Did a search and got a sheet of 5' x 10' instead of the usual 4x8. Since the beds are 50" wide this lets one do a no seam floor. He used a router to cut grooves for the steel strips and it turned out pretty good. First pic shows under side of one piece floor and second shows top side with steel strips in grooves. Blocks were to hold a 1/4" expansion gap all around, later removed after bolts were in.

    002.JPG 022.JPG
     
  9. Depoebay

    Depoebay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    Thanks Coilover that is a good way to do it. I was hoping some one would give some different ideas.

    There is two reasons why I going with a 4x8 sheet.

    1. I can't get a larger sheet of plywood here in Podunk Or.

    2. I plan on ripping the 4x8 down the center length wise. Will sister on a 7/8 inch piece to th outboard side. This will give me approx 49 3/4 inches. The sistered on piece will be hidden by the bed angles.
    By going with two pieces this will allow me to get at the hose clamps for the fuel fill.
     
  10. coilover

    coilover Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2005
    Messages:
    2,495
    Location:
    Plano US
    You are a smart fella. To use a one piece you have to take one side of the bed loose so it can be moved out to where the edges of the plywood clears the side angle strips and then bolted back together.
     
  11. Depoebay

    Depoebay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    I was wondering how that was going to work with a single piece. Just goes to show that perseverance is the key.
     
  12. Depoebay

    Depoebay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    Well back at it. Starting with the rear bed cross brace.

    Using a couple of pieces of scrap 3/4 inch plywood, to setup the spacing blocks for the cross brace. Allow for a 1/16 of inch for finish. 20170701_110651.jpg
    I used cutting board material for the spacing blocks and bolted the braceto the frame using 3/8 stainless fasteners. When tightening down the bolts make sure the holes line up on the edges where the bed side angles are. 20170701_110651.jpg 20170701_110422.jpg 20170709_132637.jpg I had to notch out part of the brace for the gas filler hose. 20170701_110456.jpg
     
  13. Depoebay

    Depoebay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    20170709_135948.jpg Center bed cross brace is a little more difficult in a 52. My 55 did not have the problem.

    My Crime Scene investigation noted that the center brace was free floating and never bolted to the frame. This probably due to the angle of the frame.You see that the brace rubbed on the frame.
    20170701_110701.jpg
    I had to notch out the brace so the brace would lay flat.
    20170709_112613.jpg
    Found a two hard rubber wedges that worked perfect for flat alignment.
    20170709_133011.jpg
    Had to bore a new hole in the brace and frame. While tightening down the bolts, I noticed the brace creeping down the frame thus miss aligning the bed side angle holes. Ah. pony clamps
    20170709_133011.jpg
     
  14. Depoebay

    Depoebay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    Don't know why pics are jumbled.
    Front brace is pretty straight forward unless you have a bent brace 20170709_141053.jpg
     
  15. Depoebay

    Depoebay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    Progress has been ongoing with the bed build.

    After the cross brace install, this is the point were the plywood and finish is up to you.

    I chose 10 ply 3/4 inch birch cabnent grade plywood.

    More to come
    Jerry
     
  16. Larrys 48

    Larrys 48 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2007
    Messages:
    618
    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    Have you considered marine grade plywood? I have some livestock panels made from marine grade ply that have been in the weather for over 25 years and still holding together without delaminating. Just saying...
     
  17. Depoebay

    Depoebay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    Marine grade plywood is a good product. Has no voids in it but has to many footballs for the finish I am after. Have used the stuff on our boats.
    Cabinet grade plywood also has no voids either
    Marine grade $90 or cabinet grade $42 20160829_145937.jpg
     
  18. Zig

    Zig Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,860
    Location:
    Pittsburg KS
    Beautiful! Does cabinet grade use waterproof glue?
     
  19. cantdrivemall

    cantdrivemall Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Messages:
    118
    Location:
    Calif.
    Cabinet grade birch doesnt use exterior glue, nor is it meant to be exposed to the elements,,, sun, rain, or water and soap when washing the vehicle. Especially the edges, or around holes.
    The top skin, or Birch, is so thin, that the slightest scratch will open it up to delamination.
    I used 2 units of cab. grade birch for an office addition at Exxon refinery, Benicia, Ca.
    Sorry to throw that curve at you.
     
  20. Depoebay

    Depoebay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2017
    Messages:
    110
    No curve ball I live in a place where plastic rusts.

    the two halves are encapsulated.
    Underside and sides are painted with a sealing primer then two coats of oil based enamel.

    The top side is finished with two poured in coats of West Systems epoxy.

    As I stated above the type of plywood and finish is up to you. My build is for my 52. It served its purpose as a farm truck, then some hacked up hot so it is retiring as a nice hot rod truck. And yes it will not haul.
     

Share This Page