Cab Corner Splash / Gravel Guards for Step Side Bed

Discussion in '1960-1966' started by Lakeroadster, Dec 21, 2014.

  1. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    I have this as part of my build thread but decided to make a new thread, in the event somebody is searching and would like to make these.

    Did you know stepside 60-66 trucks got factory bolted guards attached to the cab to prevent debris from getting onto the bed steps? My truck didn't have these when I bought it from the previous owner so rather than buy an offshore set @ $80 (LMC P/N's 38-9098 & 38-9099) I figured making a set shouldn't be to difficult. I have under $15.00 in the pair.

    Member "Lostmy65" (Robert) sent me an email with photos and a dimensional drawing showing the stock splash shield configuration. Thanks Robert, very helpful.

    After looking at the pictures of trucks with the stock OEM guards and reviewing Robert's pictures / drawing I decided to do things a bit different. I just can't leave things well enough alone. :)

    Here is a comparison photo showing an OEM style guard and the guard I designed. (Note: I widened the bed 4" on my truck, which explains the difference in location of the cab vs. the bed):

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    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 1, 2015
  2. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    Design Data and Mock up

    On the original factory rear cab supports there are already holes, as drilled at the factory, regardless of if the truck was to be a step side or fleet side.

    Here's a photo of the drivers side cab mount on my '65. The four holes that are circled are the ones that are used for the splash / gravel guards.
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    See how the cab has a body line and then you can also see the line where the splash shield is... see photo below:
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    If the splash shield was made to fit the back of the cab, instead of under the cab, it would look like less of an afterthought. Also if they were longer and went farther under the cab, and had an additional bent flange, that would also be better. So with that in mind here's a cardboard mock-up of the updated shield.:

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    Last edited: Dec 21, 2014
  3. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    Drawings

    I created a drawing set using Autocad Inventor. Guards are fabricated from 16 ga. steel sheet and use 3/8" dia. tubing for the rear support strut rods.

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    Last edited: Dec 21, 2014
  4. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    Fabrication, Post #1

    A couple folks have asked how I cut and form the steel at my shop, so I added lots of photos here.

    I print out and cut full size paper templates of the components that need to be cut from sheet steel and then transfer the templates to the 16 ga. sheet using a Sharpie marker.

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    Tools and Personal Protective Equipment

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    This is the type of cutting disc I use with my 4 inch Makita angle grinder. I clamp the steel to plywood and cut through the steel into the plywood. This holds the steel sturdier.

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    As cut components

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    Components after finish grinding

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    This is the type of flapwheel grinding disc I use for finish grinding

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    Last edited: Dec 21, 2014
  5. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    Fabrication, Post #2

    To bend the flange I start by clamping the steel to my welding table, and then begin the bend with flanging pliers.

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    Then I finish the bend using a rubber mallet. Again, this is 16 Ga. steel (.0598 th.)

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    Finish bent component

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    I bolted the brackets to the cab mounts, then held the shield in place and tack welded it. Then removed the tack welded sub assembly and finish welded the sub-assembly. Heres is the finish fabricated sub assy bolted to the truck. Back brace bracket strut rods have yet to be installed.

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    It took about 2-1/2 hours to do the above tasks.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2014
  6. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    Paint and Installation

    To prime and paint the guards I basically used the same "Faux Patina" process that I used on the rest of the truck.

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    As viewed from under the truck. I used spray on undercoating on the front facing portions of the shields, since they will be blasted by road debris.:

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    Exterior Photos:

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    Last edited: Dec 21, 2014
  7. vwnate1

    vwnate1 Member

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    John's Truck

    John ;

    In one of the under cab photos , I see what appears to be seat belt bolts with NO over size gusseting washers......

    Have you never seen someone's face and brains being squished through a shattered triplex windshield ? .

    It's pretty grim .

    After you add some washers , please detail the old Mini Bike I see in the bed .
     
  8. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    Sound advise Nate. This poor old truck has had, I speculate, ten different seats in it over the years. Some of the fasteners you see have no purpose, other than filling holes.

    In it's current condition no seat belt attachment hardware goes through the floor. Belts attach to the custom seat frames I built for the bucket seats. And yes the seat frame to floor hardware does indeed have over-sized flat washers and grade 8 bolts.

    Thanks for looking out for me Nate.

    The Mini-Bike was my first two wheeled Hot Rod. Dad bought it for me back in the mid 60's. Sear-Roebuck (Roper) 5 HP with centrifugal clutch, jack shaft and a rear disc brake. It wears it's scars proudly but is in need of a front fork rebuild.... someday.

    Sadly my Grandpa stored it in the bottom of his bank barn with the bovines, in Ohio, the last few years of it's life. The humidity and moisture wreaked havoc on the chrome. I am still amazed at how nice the seat is, OEM, and still as nice as the day it was made.

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    Last edited: Dec 22, 2014
  9. vwnate1

    vwnate1 Member

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    Son Of A Gun !

    I've not seen one of those in years .

    Nice you managed to hold onto it all these years John .

    The forks look pretty scary .

    That seat , after you dust it off , try some creme typ hand cleaner and a very soft bristle bush ~ it's amazing how well it cleans up old Moto seats .

    If you can't tweak those forks back Forks By Frank is the place to go .
     
  10. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    Thanks Nate.

    _____
    John :)
     
  11. coilover

    coilover Member

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    Just goes to show that very sanitary work can be turned out with very basic tools. We couldn't have done one iota better with a shop full of sheet metal tools. Nice.
     
    Lakeroadster likes this.

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