Hydraulic clutch question

Discussion in '1947-1954' started by fantm2flyer, Jul 5, 2022.

  1. fantm2flyer

    fantm2flyer Member

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    For some background, I did a small block conversion on my 1950 truck with a 327 engine from a '67 Chevelle, and used the bellhousing that was on the engine when I got it. I tried to use the original clutch fork but the space between the pivot ball and the center of the throwout bearing was about 1/2" too short. The bearing wasn't centered with the clutch plate. OK, so I thought I'd just order a clutch fork for a '67 Chevelle and I'd be good to go. Had the same problem with it.
    So this is probably a dumb question, but here goes. Has anyone installed a hydraulic clutch throwout bearing and kept the old clutch pedal setup? I know I'll have to get a master cylinder to operate the hydraulic clutch bearing, but I'd really like to keep my original clutch and brake pedal setup. If anyone has done this and has pictures, that'd be great. Or pictures of any similar clutch conversions, regardless of the pedal linkage. I've been scratching my head trying to figure out why the bearing and the clutch won't line up, so any suggestions for that are welcome, too.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2022
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  2. vwnate1

    vwnate1 Member

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    I'm subscribed to learn the answer .

    Short answer : yes, many have used factory parts when swapping in passenger car V8's in the decades long past .

    I've not done so so I don't know the details, IE : what clutch fork you need but it is possible .

    Maybe the hydraulic setup is they way to go for simplicity .
     
  3. fantm2flyer

    fantm2flyer Member

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    Thanks, Nate, for the reply. Yeah, I've already decided that the hydraulic route is the way to go. I've ordered a Tilton bearing and master cylinder kit, which is supposed to be here Wednesday. Once I have all the parts and pieces, I can figure out how to make it work. Will keep you posted. Thanks again.
     
  4. vwnate1

    vwnate1 Member

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    Clutch throw out bearing thoughts :

    Before you assemble it, post pictures of both the pressure plate ("COVER") and the working face of the throw out bearing because it's important to have the correct surfaces , many get this simple thing wrong and wonder why the damned thing eats clutches or T.O. bearings .

    'FESTINA LENTE' !! .
     
  5. e015475

    e015475 Member

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    I have a hydraulic throw-out bearing with the stock pedal assembly that's been modified to take a Wilwood clutch master.

    Here's a photo of the stock pedal assembly with the hydraulic master installed. I believe I used the flange that held the stock brake master and filled the holes and redrilled to mount the clutch master.

    The brake master and booster are mounted remotely on a bracket about 15" down the frame rail and connected with a rod. The pedal arms have been modified to get the correct stroke and floor pedal movement.

    [​IMG]

    There isn't enough real estate on the stock pedal assembly to get both the clutch master and brake master to fit, so the brake master and booster are moved down the frame rail using this bracket (the linkage isn't the one I used - I needed one about 15" long)

    [​IMG]

    I needed to access the clutch master and be able to bleed the hydraulic throw out, so I cut two access panels in the floor board, stiffened the opening with a flange and bead-rolled covers. The covers are held on with Dzus fasters you can undo with a coin or flat screwdriver. There's another access cover under the seat to access the brake master.

    [​IMG]

    Some detail on the covers- the angled one accesses the reservoir and the other the bleeder and linkage.

    [​IMG]

    Since the stock pedals with leverage ratios that would stroke the hydraulic masters all the way still had a couple of inches of travel before they hit the floorboards, I shortened the pedals in the cab a couple of inches for a better driving position too.

    Hope this gives you some idea of what's involved.

    Phil
     
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  6. fantm2flyer

    fantm2flyer Member

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    This is exactly what I was looking for. I knew that somebody, somewhere had done this. The pictures are great. My brake master cylinder is a Corvette master mounted under the floorboard, probably about where your clutch master is located, if I'm visualizing your setup correctly. So, if your brake master is 15" back from there, under the seat, is there any reason why my clutch master couldn't go back there? I may need to get some longer lines for the clutch master to reach that far back. I have a
     
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  7. e015475

    e015475 Member

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    I don't see any reason you couldn't remote the clutch master down along the frame rail instead of the brake master like I did.

    Here's a picture of the master cylinder access cover under the seat on mine. It'd been better a little further forward, but I already had airbag air lines there.

    [​IMG]

    Here's the cover open and the Corvette master reservoir. Keep in mind that mine has a hydroboost unit in front of the master

    [​IMG]

    Here's how the remote master/booster looks like under the truck - yours should look a lot cleaner with just a clutch master.

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. vwnate1

    vwnate1 Member

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    That looks pretty nice ! .

    I'm not a fan of the hydroboosters, I was driving a loaded rig once and had to stamp on the brakes as I was making a 90 degree right turn ~ the V-Belt slipped and so the brakes quit and the treering yanked itself straight, I nearly crossed the double yellow line and hit a car #eek# .

    Give me a vacuum booster every time ~ if it's properly installed you'll have plenty of vacuum in reserve if the engine quits .

    Keep up the good works ! .
     
  9. 52wasp

    52wasp Member

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    Nate,
    At the risk of repeating myself (oh, wait, I AM repeating myself) Hydroboost has an accumulator which stores energy in the event of a power steering-hydraulic failure. Hundreds of thousands (maybe a million by now) of vehicles have been equipped with Hydroboost. Perhaps the unit in your loaded rig was not working properly. Let's not paint with such a wide brush!
     
  10. e015475

    e015475 Member

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    They take some getting used to. Once the brakes engage it seems there's very little pedal movement and you just increase pressure with your foot to increase braking power. I've had a couple of panic stops with the truck and the brakes work really well. It might be a handfull though without power steering and brakes.

    Mine has a pressure accumulator that's supposed to be good for a couple of stops if the belt breaks or the engine quits. One of these days I'll find an empty country road and turn off the motor and see if it works.

    Thanks for the kind words!
     
  11. e015475

    e015475 Member

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    The Hydro Boost was first developed by Bosch then produced under license by GM and others. As I understand it, some of the first Hydro Boosts didn't have accumulators and they were added later as a safety enhancement to address the very issue Nate described.
     
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  12. vwnate1

    vwnate1 Member

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    Thanx Mike .

    I'm one of those 'once bitten' types.....
     

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