Stick a Fork in it-- It's done!

Discussion in '1947-1954' started by Slinger53, Apr 19, 2014.

  1. mikec4193

    mikec4193 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
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    Location:
    Upstate New York
    Hi Slinger

    I have never had a Chevy truck of this age to drive on the highway but I am about to get a nearly stock one any day now...I gotta ask how do you like it on the roadways? How does it travel along with the flow of traffic? The reason I am asking is yours appears to be stock and I want to keep mine as stock as possible. I just redid a 1947 CJ2A Willys Jeep and it struggles to go 40 MPH...(not good in any traffic situation that is for sure).

    Any insight would be great. Yours looks great by the way.

    MikeC
     
  2. vwnate1

    vwnate1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
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    11,652
    Location:
    AMERICA !
    Drivability

    Mike ;

    The original 216 engine will easily propel your stock 3100 to 60 MPH *BUT* at that speed it is wound up very tight and will fail quickly .

    The prudent driver keeps it around 45 ~ 50 MPH unless the higher ration pinion gears have been fitted .

    Using rear tires with less than 30" diameter (32" being optimum) will also reduce the prudent road travel speed .
     
  3. ol' chebby

    ol' chebby Member

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    3,164
    Location:
    Charlotte,NC
    An S10 5 speed and a Colorado rear keep the stock look and feel, with modern overdrive and better brakes. The Colorado will fit the stock wheels with a thin adapter to space out over the axle center.
     
  4. Slinger53

    Slinger53 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2009
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    53
    Location:
    Florence, Montana
    Mike,
    This truck is pretty much stock. I did replace the old 216 with a 235, and convert it over to 12 volt. It originally had the 3 on the tree, I converted it over to the old SM420 granny four speed. Some will ask, Why did you do that!? Well, I wanted to replicate the truck I had in high school.! :) The engine purrs like a kitten,and does well keeping up with traffic in town. On the hi-way it is a different story. Top speed on the highway is between 45-50. At 50 she is wound pretty tight, so I cruise along at about 45. For now, that is just fine with me. As I get older, I am beginning to enjoy life in the slow lane! People fly around me on the hi-way and I wonder what the big hurry is all about. In the future, I may install a set of 3:55's, not so much to go faster, but to reduce the stress (RPM) on the engine. As most will tell you, the steering in a stock AD can be a challenge. I have about 200 miles on this truck and I am just starting to get use to it. My goal was to re-create the truck I drove in high school, but to make it a dependable daily driver. It took me five years to complete, and I told my wife, this was first/last build. Hmmm...was that a 67 Nova that just passed me??? :)
     
  5. Slinger53

    Slinger53 Member

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    Location:
    Florence, Montana
    Hey Glenn, are you guys there every Friday, or did I miss it?
     
  6. Slinger53

    Slinger53 Member

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    Location:
    Florence, Montana
    Martinius,
    Sorry for the delay in responding. Had to hunt up my painter. The paint was supposed to be a substitute for the original mariner blue. This is what he sent me:

    Martin senour, Prism basecoat 63-282-00-A. Not being a painter, not sure if this makes sense.
     
  7. Slinger53

    Slinger53 Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Florence, Montana
    Martinius,
    Sorry for the delay in responding. Had to hunt up my painter. The paint was supposed to be a substitute for the original mariner blue. This is what he sent me:

    Martin senour, Prism basecoat 63-282-00-A. Not being a painter, not sure if this makes sense.
     
  8. GrandpaGlenn0

    GrandpaGlenn0 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
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    Location:
    Missoula
    It was justan impromptu kind of thing-- my e-mail is glenn.slay@catlin.com so let me know when you might be coming to Missoula- i'll see if we can arrange a gathering.
     
  9. gypsy truck

    gypsy truck Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2007
    Messages:
    318
    Location:
    Florida / Illinois
    Plates too!

    Very nice job. Congratulations and enjoy it on the road. Nice detail with the license plate too! I can only imagine the feeling of getting to drive it out in that scenery.
     
  10. Haasman

    Haasman Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    345
    Location:
    N. CA, south of SF
    You truck is great. Very nice job. Being into the 4th year of mine I am hopping to complete before the 5th year.

    Haasman
     
  11. Coach529

    Coach529 Member

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    Oct 2, 2012
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    Location:
    Jamestown, ND
    Beautiful truck. Very well done!!
     
  12. coonkka

    coonkka Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2011
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    Location:
    Kansas City KS
    Prize winner

    I do believe it's a real prize winner for sure. I can only hope mine turns out as well. Got any tips for those of us not finished?
     
  13. Bilbo

    Bilbo Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2007
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    682
    Location:
    Magnolia, Texas
    Nice truck! Great color of blue too. We both started and finished our trucks within a couple of months of each other. I"'ve put 1500 miles on mine so far. I'm able to run about 55 on the highway. I put a front swaybar on and it helps the steering a lot. Hope you enjoy your truck as much as I do mine!
     
  14. Slinger53

    Slinger53 Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Florence, Montana
    Sure, I think the best tip I can give you is to be patient. Several times, I got caught up in the race to get it done, and that usually resulted in a scratch in the paint or a broken rear window! The other thing I would say is know your limitations. From the beginning I knew that I was not going to be the person painting or wiring this truck. I wanted these two items to be done correctly, so I saved up my nickels and farmed this out.

    There were two items that really challenged me. First was the door windlace. What I learned was that if you take the time to open up the track the windlace slides through first, and coat it liberally with a "food grade" spray silicone, it will slide through pretty easily. After you get it in where you want it, it is important to go back with a rubber mallet and hit the windlace in four or five different spots so the track will clamp down on the windlace holding it in place. The other secret I will tell you is that I used a pair of sheet metal vice grips to grab and hold on to the windlace while pulling it through the channel.


    The second challenge I had was installing the cardboard headliner. I first tried doing this by myself. I realized pretty quickly this was a two person job. We started by installing the front section first with the center bow attached. We loosened the interior windsheild trim, and tucked the cardboard behind the windlace. I tightened up the windsheild trim to hold in place. Essentially you have the front piece installed before you start on the back section. Much like the windlace above, make sure you open up the slot on the center bow. I was pretty lucky, the rear piece slid right in the slot, and my partner held it in place while I installed the rear bow. Like the windlace, I finished the install by tapping on the center bow with a rubber mallet to re-crimp the slot holding the headliner.
     

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