Hello, My Name is...

Discussion in '1947-1954' started by RidesWithYah, Jan 10, 2011.

  1. RidesWithYah

    RidesWithYah Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Lexington KY
    Story is that the truck was parked when the brakes went out, and sat for 25 years before the engine was pulled. Bought it expecting just a core, but want to see what it's like before deciding how much it really needs. Today just pulled the valve cover and plugs, because I didn't have much time. Also going to pick up a leakdown tester and compare all of the cylinders before taking everything apart. If they read consistent, and relatively good, I may just try to fire it up.

    Concerned some water may have gotten in. Found some flakes of rust that look like they came from the inside of the valve cover. Vacuumed them up, then Kroiled the rocker shaft assembly to address the surface rust and free up the adjusters.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. vwnate1

    vwnate1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    11,109
    Location:
    AMERICA !
    Testing

    Well , it's got the truck valve cover and obviously sat out side or in a track sans hood for a long time so prolly just some minor moisture got in .

    I'd clean all that rust off then oil and adjust the valves before trying a leak down test , then change the oil and see if it'll run , these are *VERY* hard to kill engines and dead simple to overhaul if it smokes too much or has low oil pressure .

    Can you brag about how little you paid for it ? .
     
  3. RidesWithYah

    RidesWithYah Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Lexington KY
    Nate, that's the basic plan, but it'll take some time to get there.
    Will let you know know how it turns out.

    It wasn't a screaming deal, but was a fair price from a fellow enthusiast (on another forum). He's got a couple of really nice trucks, his father's '55 is all original (except paint) and looks really nice. The trip was worth it just to meet the guy and spend an hour talking trucks.

    Funny thing is, after I went three states away for this one, I just got another lead closer to home. So I may end up with another option... Stay tuned! :)
     
  4. vwnate1

    vwnate1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    11,109
    Location:
    AMERICA !
    Old Inliners

    If it turns , it WILL run .

    How carefully you re awaken it and what shape is was in when abandoned , makes a huge difference .

    I used to salvage old unwanted engines and return them to life , patch the various oil leaks , re paint them correctly then re assemble the various accessories , folks *do* want them , they just don't want to $pend much .

    Interestingly , the 6 cylinder rigs all get driven much more than the V-8 conversions do , even to - day .
     
  5. RidesWithYah

    RidesWithYah Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Lexington KY
    So a week after driving across three states to bring home a 261, my phone rings. "You the guy looking for a 261?" I had almost forgotten about the ad I put in Craigslist a long while back, with no bites. Guy said he "thought" he had two of them, still in trucks - I would need to pull them, but he wanted half of what I paid for the first one.

    Yesterday I took the day off work to go see what he had. Brought my oldest son (15) with me. First truck we saw was a 2-Ton Chevy. Raised the hood and the motor was a GMC. That hadn't been on the radar at all, so I didn't have casting numbers with me to verify it was a 302 - and no cell signal out in the hills. Grabbed the fan and it turned over freely. Hmm, definite possibility - let's see what else you got.

    Second truck was a COE. Couldn't get to any of the identifying marks (areas where captain's bars should be, or casting numbers). Another possibility. Hmm, what to do? Oh, you've got a third truck? Let's go look.

    Third truck was a '55 2-Ton, and definitely a 261. It wouldn't turn over, but I decided to grab it anyway. Will get it on a stand and see what I got. Might be able to break it loose with a little patience and persuasion; or it might just be a core. Either way, it was a great day. A little slow getting it out... Three hours in the hot sun - my son said it wasn't "fun", but I'm pretty sure he won't soon forget. And the tea at Cracker Barrel sure tasted good on the way home.

    Isn't that really what this is all about?

    The wife will kill me, but I'm thinking about going back for the GMC. ;-)
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Bill Hanlon

    Bill Hanlon Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2002
    Messages:
    2,477
    Location:
    Klein TX
    You don't need a casting number and cheat sheet to find the size of a GMC engine. The first three digits of the engine serial is the engine size. The engine serial number can be found on a machined pad just to the rear of where the distributor stabs into the engine block as shown here: http://chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com/gmc/5559mm/5559mm0i05.html

    Remember that the GMC 6 is longer than the Chevy 6, and therefore is not a drop in. At a minimum the front motor mount will need to be moved forward as will the radiator.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2014
  7. vwnate1

    vwnate1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2000
    Messages:
    11,109
    Location:
    AMERICA !
    Go back !

    ....And grab that l-o-n-g GMC motor ! .

    She'll get over it , after all you're not out getting drunk and chasing skirts :p
     
  8. RidesWithYah

    RidesWithYah Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Lexington KY
    When it rains, it pours...

    While waiting to hear back from the seller on whether the GMC is a 302, I fell into another 235. This one is reported to be a 1956. Head is 3836848; Block is 3764476. Charts online show both were used from 56-62. Other markings are CON 3 1118 on the rear passenger side of the block, and F9I5B on the distributor mounting pad. Can anyone help me interpret those?

    Don't even have the valve cover off yet, but it turns over freely.
    At the very least, I've got another head for one of the 261s.

    Will keep you posted on the GMC.
     
  9. 50 Chevy LS3

    50 Chevy LS3 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Messages:
    941
    Location:
    Indiana
    The "F" stands for Flint, Michigan. (assembly plant).
    The "915" means it was produced on Sept. 15.
    The "B" is a type designation, and tells us it was originally equiped with a powerglide transmission.
    I think you have a '57 car engine. Should be drilled for side mount engine mounts, I think.
     
  10. RidesWithYah

    RidesWithYah Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Lexington KY
    Another Great Day!

    Well, yesterday was a good day...

    The trans case is marked
    GM 1
    3845122
    L204

    Sideplate - 3845044 GM

    Tail:
    11-20
    4
    R10H-1
    WG DIV

    The Tattersfield intake is marked
    Driver Side -AFE C6693
    Underneath - CD300 B

    I continue to be blessed with help from good people. Transactions are easy when both parties are trying to be fair. I put an ad on Craigslist looking for the OD transmission. Got a call from a guy who had one he was willing to part with for a fair price, only about an hour and a half away. Looks like it's in real nice shape inside. Had a factory floor shifter on it that the seller wanted to keep; and the input shaft had been unbolted, but it looked like everything was present and accounted for except for the bolts.

    Seller also had the Tattersfield, it looks like it's never been installed. Said he bought it at a swap meet 20 years ago or so, and never used it because plans change. Looks like maybe mine just did too.
     
  11. RidesWithYah

    RidesWithYah Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Lexington KY
    Trying again, with pics...

    Pics didn't come through, probably operator error.
    Trying again.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Zig

    Zig Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,860
    Location:
    Pittsburg KS
    Cool looking intake! What size engine is it going on?
     
  13. RidesWithYah

    RidesWithYah Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Lexington KY
    I plan to use a 261, unless my lead on a 302 pans out, in which case I would need a different intake...
     
  14. RidesWithYah

    RidesWithYah Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Lexington KY
    Found another overdrive locally.
    This one came out of a (very nice) 1969 1/2 ton.
    Owner replaced it with an automatic overdrive when he swapped the rear end.
    (Also tells me that the 73-87 front ends bolt right onto the 67-72s, which is how he got power steering, disc brakes, and five lug wheels to match his new rear...)

    Anyhoo, he included the wiring harness, including the throttle switch. Not sure if I'll adapt that, or one of the alternate setups. Also noticed that this one says "R10K-1" rather than "R10H-1" on the first one I got. Anyone know the difference?

    Other markings are:
    E18-2
    15
    3744820 F202
    3839534 5 GM
     

    Attached Files:

  15. RidesWithYah

    RidesWithYah Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Lexington KY
    Pulled the truck out of the garage yesterday, so that I can get to all sides and so that I have room to work in the garage. May not seem like much, but it's one small step...
     

    Attached Files:

  16. ccharr

    ccharr Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    2,175
    Location:
    Simi Valley, Ca. , La Paz County, Az.
    Looking like you will have many to choose for the build to get it on the rode.
     
  17. RidesWithYah

    RidesWithYah Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Lexington KY
    Milestone!

    Resurrecting an old engine always feels good.
    LINK==>
    Got the 235 started today for the first time since 2003.

    Started with Sta-bil fogging oil in the cylinders, and pouring fresh oil over the rockers. Then cranked it over without the plugs until the oil started flowing strongly from the rockers. A little gas down the carb, close the choke, hit the ignition, and it fired right up. Run it until warm, shut it down, and check compression -- 145 +/- 5ish with the cheap gauge I've got. I don't plan to use the bottom end, but nice to know it seems solid if I run low on cash before the build is done. (What are the odds of that??)

    And the best part?
    I'll get to do this again a few more times, as I plan to check the health of my other motors, new to me and with unknown history, the same way. Hopefully the bottom end of at least one of the 261s will be solid, and I can just swap an 848 head (maybe this one) onto it.

    Y'all have a great week!
     
  18. wolffcub

    wolffcub Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2014
    Messages:
    38
    so that's how you oil the distributor! all this time i have been using the grease cap of the side of the housing.
     
  19. RidesWithYah

    RidesWithYah Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Lexington KY
    Another step along the way.

    Question on cab removal - how does the steering column disassemble; or is the cab lifted off of the column after removing the wheel?
     

    Attached Files:

  20. Zig

    Zig Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,860
    Location:
    Pittsburg KS
    Remove the steering wheel, disconnect/cut the horn wire, (if you have one) unbolt the steering box from the frame (after disconnecting the pitman arm) And then wiggle/swear the column out through the hole.
    It's really not a big deal at all. Then you are ready to remove or roll the cab back on the frame.
    It's looking good!
     

Share This Page