She's bed-hopping

Discussion in '1960-1966' started by Ratnest, Jul 6, 2015.

  1. Ratnest

    Ratnest Member

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    Not meant to be a sexual innuendo;). I've really been enjoying driving my 66 and soaking up lots of ego boosting comments. However, the bed is very light and tends to bounce a little when I hit a bump in the road. It's even worse when I turn a bumpy corner!

    A friend suggested I weld a piece of railroad rail under the bed near the rear axle...that seems a little hokey to me though. The front and rear is 89 Suburban and all else is basically stock. I want to retain the truck-looking height and not have to change front suspension components to bring the front down to match a lowered rear.

    Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks:confused:
     
  2. JW 54

    JW 54 Member

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    How about this?

    How about giving this a try. image.jpg
     
  3. Ratnest

    Ratnest Member

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    Wow...that's one response I never expected! That's way cool:D
     
  4. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    How about putting something period correct in the bed, something that represents your favorite things, hobbies, etc.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Ratnest

    Ratnest Member

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    I like the Hooters suggestion. At my age I can't attract any of those. But...I bet I can come up with a chubby Redneck girl:)
     
  6. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    This works well... I use them in the winter time for ballast in my truck. http://www.quikrete.com/productlines/SandTubesand.asp

    [​IMG]

    Only issue is in the winter when they freeze they are a 60 pound frozen projectile sliding around in the bed and therefore need to be restrained.
     
  7. Ratnest

    Ratnest Member

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    I'd have to restrain both the quikrete and the chubby chick!!
    Too much hassle and I could get hurt:eek:
     
  8. markeb01

    markeb01 Member

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    The only solution I ever found for mine was adding a Gaylord hard cover, and carry around stuff under it like a spare tire, jack, a shade tent, tools, and lawn chairs so we're always ready for a picnic or car show.
     
  9. Ratnest

    Ratnest Member

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    Thanks markebo1...but after all the work on the oak planks I don't want to cover them.

    I'm thinking I might put some sand bags in the bed...starting with 100# and increasing weight till I get a better ride. Hopefully, there will be a happy medium where the ride is a good as I can get it without raising the front end too much. If that works, I may try my friends idea of adding the same amount of weight under the bed. I could use my metal chop saw and "dial in" the railroad rail to whatever weight I want. I really don't want to get into dropped spindles unless I have to.
     
  10. 50 Chevy LS3

    50 Chevy LS3 Member

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    don't drive around loaded...

    As much as I like 'roadsters choice #1 and #3 in post 4, I think I would attempt to find a solution that did not require me to go loaded all the time.
    Is your suburban chassis a 3/4 ton version?
    I think a guy could either have a spring shop build a "lighter" spring that would retain the ride height, or, on a budget, go searching the pap for a set of springs off of anything with the same width and spring eye measurements. Or, have the spring shop take a leaf out and re-arch them.
     
  11. Ratnest

    Ratnest Member

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    The Suburban that the parts came from was a 2wd, so I guess it was a 1/2 ton. I never saw the vehicle. Thanks for the alternatives to consider.
     
  12. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    What are you running for rear coil springs? As Steve mentioned, a simple swap to a set with a lower spring rate would give you a softer ride.

    I had a set of 4" drop springs on my truck for a short while that made it ride like a big ole Buick!

    ____
    John
     
  13. Ratnest

    Ratnest Member

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    The stock 66 coil springs on the rear. Do you know a good source for the softer springs? And, how much less spring rate should I consider? Thanks John
     
  14. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    CPP is who I bought the springs from, they were P/N RCS603-5 and were 5" lowering springs.

    I ended up getting rid of those and replaced them 4" Heavy Duty Lowering springs, P/N CPP P/N 603-4HD, which rode much better, not so spongy.

    Now, I know that's not what you want, lowering springs. But nonetheless they do have stock height rear springs, P/N RCS603-S. You should be able to contact CPP and find out if these are the same spring rate as the 4" HD lowering springs.

    Here's the link to CPP: http://www.classicperform.com/Chevy-Truck.htm#28

    Hope that helps!

    As a side note, a bunch of vendors buy springs directly from CPP, so do your research. Otherwise you may end up paying more for the same part.

    _____
    John
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2015
  15. Ratnest

    Ratnest Member

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    Thanks John. It helps a lot. I'll do some research using your advice and get back with my decision.
     
  16. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    Another thing you might want to do is post up a photo or two of your current springs.

    My truck had progressive springs when I bought it. Basically this means the coil springs are made so the more load you put on it the stiffer it gets. If that's what you have now adding weight to the rear of your truck may not make it ride better... it may make it worse :eek:

    [​IMG]

    Here's a photo of the CPP springs I used. 4" Heavy Duty Drop Springs are on the left, CPP P/N RCS603-4HD, 5" Drop Springs are on the right, CPP P/N 603-5. Neither are progressive. You can see how the 5" have less coils and are actually made from smaller diameter wire.... that's why the truck rode like a Buick. Actually couldn't haul much more than a couple hundred pounds in it either?

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2015
  17. 50 Chevy LS3

    50 Chevy LS3 Member

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    I thought by 1989, Suburbans had leaf springs. As John pointed out, same idea applies. This can be fixed without throwing weight in the back.
     
  18. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    Hey Steve, I think Ratnest just used the rear axle, not the entire rear suspension. At least that's what I recall from previous discussions..... :confused:

    _____
    John
     
  19. Lakeroadster

    Lakeroadster Member

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    Found this photo to confirm:

    [​IMG]

    _____
    John
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2015
  20. 50 Chevy LS3

    50 Chevy LS3 Member

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    OK, I was confused. Anyway, this is right up your alley, John. I think this can be fixed with little cost, and minimal effort.

    I've got to go back and look at some threads. That is a cool looking truck!

    P.S. fuel tank back there where I'm puttin' mine.
     

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